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Your Baby at 2 MonthsChild’s NameChild’s AgeToday’s DateMilestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or herdevelopment. Check the milestones your child has reached by 2 months. Take this with you and talk with your child’sdoctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.What Most Babies Do by this Age:Social/Emotionalo Begins to smile at peopleo Can briefly calm himself(may bring hands to mouth and suck on hand)o Tries to look at parentLanguage/Communicationo Coos, makes gurgling soundso Turns head toward soundsCognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)You Know Your Child Best.Act early if you have concerns about the way your child plays,learns, speaks, acts, or moves, or if your child:ooooooIs missing milestonesDoesn’t respond to loud soundsDoesn’t watch things as they moveDoesn’t smile at peopleDoesn’t bring hands to mouthCan’t hold head up when pushing up when on tummyTell your child’s doctor or nurse if you notice any ofthese signs of possible developmental delay and ask fora developmental screening.o Pays attention to faceso Begins to follow things with eyes and recognize people ata distanceo Begins to act bored (cries, fussy) if activity doesn’t changeIf you or the doctor is still concerned1. Ask for a referral to a specialist and,2. Call your state or territory’s early intervention programto find out if your child can get services to help. Learnmore and find the number at cdc.gov/FindEI.Movement/Physical DevelopmentFor more information, go to cdc.gov/Concerned.o Can hold head up and begins to push up when lying on tummyo Makes smoother movements with arms and legsDON’T WAIT.Acting early can make a real difference!www.cdc.gov/ActEarly1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)Learn the Signs. Act Early.

Help Your Baby Learn and GrowYou can help your baby learn and grow. Talk, read, sing, and play together every day.Below are some activities to enjoy with your 2-month-old baby today.What You Can Do for Your 2-Month-Old:o Cuddle, talk, and play with your baby during feeding,dressing, and bathing.o Place a baby-safe mirror in your baby’s crib soshe can look at herself.o Help your baby learn to calm herself. It’s okay forher to suck on her fingers.o Begin to help your baby get into a routine,such as sleeping at night more than in the day,and have regular schedules.o Getting in tune with your baby’s likes and dislikescan help you feel more comfortable and confident.o Act excited and smile when your babymakes sounds.o Copy your baby’s sounds sometimes, but also useo Look at pictures with your baby and talkabout them.o Lay your baby on his tummy when he is awakeand put toys near him.o Encourage your baby to lift his head by holdingtoys at eye level in front of him.o Hold a toy or rattle above your baby’s head andencourage her to reach for it.o Hold your baby upright with his feet on the floor.Sing or talk to your baby as he is upright.clear language.o Pay attention to your baby’s different cries so thatyou learn to know what he wants.o Talk, read, and sing to your baby.o Play peek-a-boo. Help your baby playpeek-a-boo, too.Milestones adapted from CARING FOR YOUR BABY AND YOUNG CHILD: BIRTH TO AGE 5, Fifth Edition, edited by Steven Shelov and Tanya Remer Altmann 1991, 1993, 1998, 2004, 2009 by the AmericanAcademy of Pediatrics and BRIGHT FUTURES: GUIDELINES FOR HEALTH SUPERVISION OF INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND ADOLESCENTS, Third Edition, edited by Joseph Hagan, Jr., Judith S. Shaw, and Paula M.Duncan, 2008, Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.This milestone checklist is not a substitute for a standardized, validated developmental screening tool.www.cdc.gov/ActEarly 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)Learn the Signs. Act Early.

Your Baby at 4 MonthsChild’s NameChild’s AgeToday’s DateMilestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or herdevelopment. Check the milestones your child has reached by 4 months. Take this with you and talk with your child’sdoctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.What Most Babies Do by this Age:Social/Emotionalo Smiles spontaneously, especially at peopleo Likes to play with people and might cry when playing stopso Copies some movements and facial expressions, like smilingor frowningLanguage/Communicationo Begins to babbleo Babbles with expression and copies sounds he hearso Cries in different ways to show hunger, pain, or being tiredCognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)Lets you know if she is happy or sadResponds to affectionReaches for toy with one handUses hands and eyes together, such as seeing a toyand reaching for ito Follows moving things with eyes from side to sideo Watches faces closelyo Recognizes familiar people and things at a distanceooooYou Know Your Child Best.Act early if you have concerns about the way your child plays,learns, speaks, acts, or moves, or if your child:Is missing milestonesDoesn’t watch things as they moveDoesn’t smile at peopleCan’t hold head steadyDoesn’t coo or make soundsDoesn’t bring things to mouthDoesn’t push down with legs when feet are placed ona hard surfaceo Has trouble moving one or both eyes in all directionsoooooooTell your child’s doctor or nurse if you notice any ofthese signs of possible developmental delay and ask fora developmental screening.If you or the doctor is still concerned1. Ask for a referral to a specialist and,2. Call your state or territory’s early intervention programto find out if your child can get services to help. Learnmore and find the number at cdc.gov/FindEI.For more information, go to cdc.gov/Concerned.Movement/Physical DevelopmentooooooHolds head steady, unsupportedPushes down on legs when feet are on a hard surfaceMay be able to roll over from tummy to backCan hold a toy and shake it and swing at dangling toysBrings hands to mouthWhen lying on stomach, pushes up to elbowsDON’T WAIT.Acting early can make a real difference!www.cdc.gov/ActEarly1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)Learn the Signs. Act Early.

Help Your Baby Learn and GrowYou can help your baby learn and grow. Talk, read, sing, and play together every day.Below are some activities to enjoy with your 4-month-old baby today.What You Can Do for Your 4-Month-Old:o Hold and talk to your baby; smile and be cheerfulwhile you do.o Put toys near your baby so that she can reach forthem or kick her feet.o Set steady routines for sleeping and feeding.o Pay close attention to what your baby likes anddoesn’t like; you will know how best to meethis needs and what you can do to make yourbaby happy.o Put toys or rattles in your baby’s hand and helphim to hold them.o Hold your baby upright with feet on the floor,and sing or talk to your baby as she “stands”with support.o Copy your baby’s sounds.o Act excited and smile when your baby makessounds.o Have quiet play times when you read or sing toyour baby.o Give age-appropriate toys to play with, such asrattles or colorful pictures.o Play games such as peek-a-boo.o Provide safe opportunities for your baby to reachfor toys and explore his surroundings.Milestones adapted from CARING FOR YOUR BABY AND YOUNG CHILD: BIRTH TO AGE 5, Fifth Edition, edited by Steven Shelov and Tanya Remer Altmann 1991, 1993, 1998, 2004, 2009 by the AmericanAcademy of Pediatrics and BRIGHT FUTURES: GUIDELINES FOR HEALTH SUPERVISION OF INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND ADOLESCENTS, Third Edition, edited by Joseph Hagan, Jr., Judith S. Shaw, and Paula M.Duncan, 2008, Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.This milestone checklist is not a substitute for a standardized, validated developmental screening tool.www.cdc.gov/ActEarly 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)Learn the Signs. Act Early.

Your Baby at 6 MonthsChild’s NameChild’s AgeToday’s DateMilestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or herdevelopment. Check the milestones your child has reached by 6 months. Take this with you and talk with your child’sdoctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.What Most Babies Do by this Age:Social/Emotionalo Knows familiar faces and begins to know if someone isa strangero Likes to play with others, especially parentso Responds to other people’s emotions and often seems happyo Likes to look at self in a mirrorLanguage/Communicationo Responds to sounds by making soundso Strings vowels together when babbling (“ah,” “eh,” “oh”)and likes taking turns with parent while making soundso Responds to own nameo Makes sounds to show joy and displeasureo Begins to say consonant sounds (jabbering with “m,” “b”)Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)o Looks around at things nearbyo Brings things to moutho Shows curiosity about things and tries to get things that areout of reacho Begins to pass things from one hand to the otherYou Know Your Child Best.Act early if you have concerns about the way your child plays,learns, speaks, acts, or moves, or if your child:ooooooooooIs missing milestonesDoesn’t try to get things that are in reachShows no affection for caregiversDoesn’t respond to sounds around himHas difficulty getting things to mouthDoesn’t make vowel sounds (“ah”, “eh”, “oh”)Doesn’t roll over in either directionDoesn’t laugh or make squealing soundsSeems very stiff, with tight musclesSeems very floppy, like a rag dollTell your child’s doctor or nurse if you notice any ofthese signs of possible developmental delay and ask fora developmental screening.If you or the doctor is still concerned1. Ask for a referral to a specialist and,2. Call your state or territory’s early intervention programto find out if your child can get services to help. Learnmore and find the number at cdc.gov/FindEI.For more information, go to cdc.gov/Concerned.Movement/Physical DevelopmentooooRolls over in both directions (front to back, back to front)Begins to sit without supportWhen standing, supports weight on legs and might bounceRocks back and forth, sometimes crawling backward beforemoving forwardDON’T WAIT.Acting early can make a real difference!www.cdc.gov/ActEarly1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)Learn the Signs. Act Early.

Help Your Baby Learn and GrowYou can help your baby learn and grow. Talk, read, sing, and play together every day.Below are some activities to enjoy with your 6-month-old baby today.What You Can Do for Your 6-Month-Old:o Play on the floor with your baby every day.o Point out new things to your baby and name them.o Learn to read your baby’s moods. If he’s happy,o Show your baby bright pictures in a magazine andkeep doing what you are doing. If he’s upset, take abreak and comfort your baby.o Show your baby how to comfort herself when she’supset. She may suck on her fingers to self soothe.o Use “reciprocal” play—when he smiles, you smile;when he makes sounds, you copy them.o Repeat your child’s sounds and say simple wordsname them.o Hold your baby up while she sits or support herwith pillows. Let her look around and give her toysto look at while she balances.o Put your baby on his tummy or back and put toysjust out of reach. Encourage him to roll over to reachthe toys.with those sounds. For example, if your child says“bah,” say “bottle” or “book.”o Read books to your child every day. Praise her whenshe babbles and “reads” too.o When your baby looks at something, point to it andtalk about it.o When he drops a toy on the floor, pick it up and giveit back. This game helps him learn cause and effect.o Read colorful picture books to your baby.Milestones adapted from CARING FOR YOUR BABY AND YOUNG CHILD: BIRTH TO AGE 5, Fifth Edition, edited by Steven Shelov and Tanya Remer Altmann 1991, 1993, 1998, 2004, 2009 by the AmericanAcademy of Pediatrics and BRIGHT FUTURES: GUIDELINES FOR HEALTH SUPERVISION OF INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND ADOLESCENTS, Third Edition, edited by Joseph Hagan, Jr., Judith S. Shaw, and Paula M.Duncan, 2008, Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.This milestone checklist is not a substitute for a standardized, validated developmental screening tool.www.cdc.gov/ActEarly 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)Learn the Signs. Act Early.

Your Baby at 9 MonthsChild’s NameChild’s AgeToday’s DateMilestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or herdevelopment. Check the milestones your child has reached by 9 months. Take this with you and talk with your child’sdoctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.What Most Babies Do by this Age:Social/EmotionalAct early if you have concerns about the way your child plays,learns, speaks, acts, or moves, or if your child:o May be afraid of strangerso May be clingy with familiar adultso Has favorite toysLanguage/Communicationo Understands “no”o Makes a lot of different sounds like “mamamama” and“bababababa”o Copies sounds and gestures of otherso Uses fingers to point at thingsCognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)ooooooWatches the path of something as it fallsLooks for things he sees you hidePlays peek-a-booPuts things in her mouthMoves things smoothly from one hand to the otherPicks up things like cereal o’s between thumb and index fingerMovement/Physical DevelopmentoooooStands, holding onCan get into sitting positionSits without supportPulls to standCrawlsYou Know Your Child Best.oooooooooIs missing milestonesDoesn’t bear weight on legs with supportDoesn’t sit with helpDoesn’t babble (“mama”, “baba”, “dada”)Doesn’t play any games involving back-and-forth playDoesn’t respond to own nameDoesn’t seem to recognize familiar peopleDoesn’t look where you pointDoesn’t transfer toys from one hand to the otherTell your child’s doctor or nurse if you notice any ofthese signs of possible developmental delay and ask fora developmental screening.If you or the doctor is still concerned1. Ask for a referral to a specialist and,2. Call your state or territory’s early intervention programto find out if your child can get services to help. Learnmore and find the number at cdc.gov/FindEI.For more information, go to cdc.gov/Concerned.DON’T WAIT.Acting early can make a real difference!It’s time for developmental screening!At 9 months, your child is due for general developmentalscreening, as recommended for all children by the AmericanAcademy of Pediatrics. Ask the doctor about your child’sdevelopmental screening.www.cdc.gov/ActEarly1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)Learn the Signs. Act Early.

Help Your Baby Learn and GrowYou can help your baby learn and grow. Talk, read, sing, and play together every day.Below are some activities to enjoy with your 9-month-old baby today.What You Can Do for Your 9-Month-Old:o Pay attention to the way he reacts to new situationsand people; try to continue to do things that makeyour baby happy and comfortable.o As she moves around more, stay close so she knowsthat you are near.o Continue with routines; they are especiallyimportant now.o Teach cause-and-effect by rolling balls back andforth, pushing toy cars and trucks, and putting blocksin and out of a container.o Play peek-a-boo and hide-and-seek.o Read and talk to your baby.o Provide lots of room for your baby to move andexplore in a safe area.o Play games with “my turn, your turn.”o Say what you think your baby is feeling. For example,o Put your baby close to things that she can pull upon safely.say, “You are so sad, let’s see if we can make youfeel better.”o Describe what your baby is looking at; for example,“red, round ball.”o Talk about what your baby wants when he pointsat something.o Copy your baby’s sounds and words.o Ask for behaviors that you want. For example,instead of saying “don’t stand,” say “time to sit.”Milestones adapted from CARING FOR YOUR BABY AND YOUNG CHILD: BIRTH TO AGE 5, Fifth Edition, edited by Steven Shelov and Tanya Remer Altmann 1991, 1993, 1998, 2004, 2009 by the AmericanAcademy of Pediatrics and BRIGHT FUTURES: GUIDELINES FOR HEALTH SUPERVISION OF INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND ADOLESCENTS, Third Edition, edited by Joseph Hagan, Jr., Judith S. Shaw, and Paula M.Duncan, 2008, Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.This milestone checklist is not a substitute for a standardized, validated developmental screening tool.www.cdc.gov/ActEarly 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)Learn the Signs. Act Early.

Your Child at 1 YearChild’s NameChild’s AgeToday’s DateMilestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or herdevelopment. Check the milestones your child has reached by age 1. Take this with you and talk with your child’sdoctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.What Most Children Do by this Age:Social/EmotionalooooooooIs shy or nervous with strangersCries when mom or dad leavesHas favorite things and peopleShows fear in some situationsHands you a book when he wants to hear a storyRepeats sounds or actions to get attentionPuts out arm or leg to help with dressingPlays games such as “peek-a-boo” and “pat-a-cake”Language/Communicationo Responds to simple spoken requestso Uses simple gestures, like shaking head “no”or waving “bye-bye”o Makes sounds with changes in tone (sounds more like speech)o Says “mama” and “dada” and exclamations like “uh-oh!”o Tries to say words you sayCognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)o Explores things in different ways, like shaking,banging, throwingo Finds hidden things easilyo Looks at the right picture or thing when it’s namedo Copies gestureso Starts to use things correctly; for example, drinks froma cup, brushes hairo Bangs two things togethero Puts things in a container, takes things out of a containero Lets things go without helpo Pokes with index (pointer) fingero Follows simple directions like “pick up the toy”Movement/Physical DevelopmentooooGets to a sitting position without helpPulls up to stand, walks holding on to furniture (“cruising”)May take a few steps without holding onMay stand aloneYou Know Your Child Best.Act early if you have concerns about the way your child plays,learns, speaks, acts, or moves, or if your child:ooooooooIs missing milestonesDoesn’t crawlCan’t stand when supportedDoesn’t search for things that she sees you hide.Doesn’t say single words like “mama” or “dada”Doesn’t learn gestures like waving or shaking headDoesn’t point to thingsLoses skills he once hadTell your child’s doctor or nurse if you notice any ofthese signs of possible developmental delay and ask fora developmental screening.If you or the doctor is still concerned1. Ask for a referral to a specialist and,2. Call your state or territory’s early intervention programto find out if your child can get services to help. Learnmore and find the number at cdc.gov/FindEI.For more information, go to cdc.gov/Concerned.DON’T WAIT.Acting early can make a real difference!www.cdc.gov/ActEarly1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)Learn the Signs. Act Early.

Help Your Child Learn and GrowYou can help your child learn and grow. Talk, read, sing, and play together every day.Below are some activities to enjoy with your 1-year-old child today.What You Can Do for Your 1-Year-Old:o Give your child time to get to know a new caregiver.Bring a favorite toy, stuffed animal, or blanket to helpcomfort your child.o In response to unwanted behaviors, say “no” firmly.Do not yell, spank, or give long explanations. A timeout for 30 seconds to 1 minute might help redirectyour child.o Give your child lots of hugs, kisses, and praise forgood behavior.when she tries to copy them.o Play with blocks, shape sorters, and other toys thatencourage your child to use his hands.o Hide small toys and other things and have yourchild find them.o Ask your child to label body parts or things you seewhile driving in the car.o